Monday, October 18, 2010

Here We Go!

I received my meds via FedEx this morning and am now waiting for the OK from the nurse at the IVF clinic to begin my injections this morning :) Woohoo!!!

6 comments:

Rebecca Wiley said...

Those Vivelle Dots look familiar :-)

Why do you have to use them, just wondering b/c I don't know how the IVF process works.

Good luck!

Jennifer said...

Becky ~ in the world of IVF, its a must for my body to think its pregnant prior to implanting the little embabies. So, they start out by "killing" my monthly cycle, starting me on the estrogen patches (Vivelle dots) to help build up my uterine lining, then the week of the transfer, I begin the progesterone injections. All of it together makes my body think its pregnant, and makes the little embryos stick to my uterus once they are emplanted (hopefully) :)

Shaunaaaaaaa said...

Hi I'm stalking you as I have started this surrogate process as well.. We've had two failed IVF cycles so far so its been stressful. Curious as to what the different meds are in the RX bottles..I have only done Lupron, vivelle, and progesterone so just wondering. Thanks and good luck on your journey!

Jennifer said...

Hi Shauna :) No worries about the questions. I'm an open book when it comes to surrogacy because I've had allot of encouragement & advice from other experienced surrogates, and I know how invaluable that experience & advice can be!

When we are gearing up to cycle, I contact the IVF clinic on day 1 of my period and begin taking BCP's on a designated day - this time around it was day 3. I've been on the BCP's since 10/6. Anyway, I started my Lupron injections (10cc per day) and will continue the BCP's through tomorrow (Weds is the last BCP). I will continue the Lupron until I get my cycle, and will then switch over to 5cc Lupron, 1 Vivelle patch and a baby aspirin. The Vivelle is switched out every other day for 4 patches (8 days), at which point I will go in for labs & an U/S to check my lining and estrogen levels. At that stage I will increase 1 patch every other day (2 then 3 then 4) and they will continue to monitor my lining and estrogen levels; I will be continuing to change out the 4 patches every other day (for weeks!). The week prior to transfer I will begin the PIO shots AND prometrium suppositories, stopping the Lupron when the PIO starts. From that point, its days until transfer. The other Rx bottles are Medrol and Tetracycline to take the week prior to transfer (antibiotics that will kill off any harmful bacteria). There is also a valium in there :) I get to take that a few minutes prior to transfer - it keeps the uterus relaxed :) Then its bedrest for the day of & the day after!

After transfer I will continue with the daily PIO shot until the 6 week u/s for heartbeats, then will drop that and begin using another suppository that I can't remember the name of, until around the 10 week mark. I will also continue with the Vivelle patches until further notice. The goo get's old but it so worth it :)

So there you go! Lots of meds but they all serve a very specific purpose and are taken at a very specific time.

Feel free to email me if you need to talk (jsegulja@gmail.com)! I wish you all the best in your surro journey. Its very emotional for everyone involved and I know how important it is to have a connection with others that are going through the same emotions. If you don't mind me asking, where do you live?

Kelly & Her Uterus said...

It's always exciting to get the meds!! I find it interesting to see how different surrogates get put on different meds. . . . but it's all leading to the same thing- babies!!!!

Shaunaaaaaaa said...

I live in Sacramento Ca..thanks for sharing that info it is interesting, as Kelly above has said to see what meds everyone takes. This time around for me we are adding extra meds, including baby aspirin which hasn't been taken before..I know they know what they are doing but I asked them if they check my hormone levels at all and they said its not necessary..hmmm I'll feel most confident once I have had a successful pregnancy.